Grading with MobLab

Evaluating students' progress and understanding of course material is an important part of teaching. When using MobLab, here are some general guidelines to keep grading simple for you and encourage students to learn through experimentation. 

Please review our article about the MobLab Gradebook to learn how to use the Gradebook in the instructor console.

 

Recommended Grading Rubric

Most instructors allocate around 10% of students' grades towards MobLab activities. While some only count participation in activities and surveys, we recommend tracking participation in games and using graded surveys or quizzes for points.

 

Participation vs. Points

While it may be tempting to grade students on the points or 'earnings' from a game, often times game earnings are tied to random endowments or roles. This can be perceived as unfair by students. Instead, we recommend tracking student participation in activities. This lowers the stakes for students and encourages them to test strategies or theories without the fear of a bad grade. 

Conversely, surveys and quizzes can be graded for correctness and are a great tool to check for game instruction comprehension, or to review the main learning objectives of a game or lecture. 

 

Keep Stakes Low

There is always the chance that a student's device will run out of battery or the wifi may be spotty, so it is helpful to keep the stakes low with MobLab activities. This also reduces student stress and allows them to focus more on their strategies and the game.

Over the course of a term, we recommend allowing a 'freebie' game or activity to students. For example, if you run 5 MobLab activities, only count 4 towards their participation grade. This gives students some wiggle room in the grade should any tech issues prevent them from participating. 

 

Integrate MobLab with Other Class Assignments

Leverage MobLab games and activities in other class assignments like short essays, student presentations, or test questions. This gives you another way of assessing students using more traditional methods, but also carrying themes and content throughout the course. 

 

 

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